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Best Animal Dads

Celebrate Father's Day for everyone and everything! Check out these loving fathers and see how they care for their offspring.

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    The barking frog - named for its throaty, dog-like call - guards his brood after the female lays her eggs under rocks or logs. The frog hangs out by the eggs for several weeks, wetting the eggs with his urine if they dry out. Thanks dad!
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    These male marmosets in South America not only carry, feed, and groom their babies, but can also act as "midwives" during birth, grooming and licking the newborns.
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    Seahorses are a type of fish in which the MALES actually get "pregnant"! The female seahore deposits her eggs in the male's specialized poch, and the male then carries up to 2,000 babies during the 10 - 25 day pregnancy.
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    For most birds, the females are stick with child care, but not so for South America's greater rhea. The male will incubate up to 50 eggs for six weeks and care for teh newly hatched young. These dads must aggressively guard the babies by charging at any animal - even a femal rhea - that approaches.
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    The male water bug iterally totes around his brood of about 150 eggs until they hatch. The daddy water bug protects his eggs and periodically exposes them to air to prevent them from growing mold. How sweet!
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    Cockroaches aren't a very cute animal, but you can't call them deadbeat dads. Cockroach fathers will eat bird droppings to obtain nitrogen, a necessary part of their diet, and carry it back to their young. Would your father do that for you? The wood-feeding cockroaches are also very tidy, sweeping nurseries clean of dead cockroaches and fungus to shield their families from infection.
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    The Emperor Penguin, made famous by the movie March Of The Penguins, endure below-freezing temperatures and forgo food to incubate their eggs. The males huddle together for four months, not moving much, while the females fill up on seafood in the ocean.